What is 5G and how it Works?
Thursday 27 April 2017

What is 5G and how it Works?

As we all know, 5G means fifth generation and it refers to the next and newest mobile wireless standard based on the IEEE 802.11ac standard of broadband technology. Even though 5G is not expected until 2020, too many companies are investing now to prepare themselves for new mobile wireless standard. The interesting part is a formal standard for 5G is yet to be set.

As 5G is still in development, it is not yet open for use by anyone. However, lots of companies have started creating 5G products and field testing them. 5G will be significantly faster than 4G, allowing for higher productivity across all capable devices with a theoretical download speed of 10,000 Mbps. Plus, with greater bandwidth comes faster download speeds and the ability to run more complex mobile internet apps.

A reliable, wireless internet connection can depend on the number of devices connected to one channel. With the addition of 5G to the wireless spectrum, this could put us at risk of overcrowding the frequency range. However, 5G will cost more to implement and while the newest mobile phones will probably have it integrated, other handsets could be deemed out of date.

Previous generations like 3G were a breakthrough in communications. 3G receives a signal from the nearest phone tower and is used for phone calls, messaging and data. 4G works the same as 3G but with a faster internet connection and a lower latency (the time between cause and effect). 4G claims to be around five times faster than existing 3G services and theoretically it can provide download speeds of up to 100Mbps.

"Current 4G mobile standards have the potential to provide 100s of Mbps. 5G offers to take that into multi-gigabits per second, giving rise to the ‘Gigabit Smartphone’ and hopefully a slew of innovative services and applications that truly need the type of connectivity that only 5G can offer," says Paul Gainham, senior director, SP Marketing EMEA at Juniper Networks.

Notable advancements in 5G technologies have come from Nokia, Qualcomm, Samsung, Ericsson and BT, with growing numbers of companies forming 5G partnerships and pledging money to continue to research into 5G and its application.